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Webinar Marine Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction in the Southeast Pacific and Southeast Atlantic   Event hosted by the Abidjan Convention Secretariat, the Secretariat of the Permanent Commission for the South Pacific...
Atelier d’élaboration des plans d’actions des protocoles en vue de la préparation de la réunion des plénipotentiaires Plus d'informationc ici http://abidjanconvention.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=343&lang=f...
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STRONG HIGH SEAS ORGANIZES A CAPACITY BUILDING WORKSHOP ON BIODIVERSITY BEYOND NATIONAL JURISDICTION

Abidjan - From 3 to 8 September 2018 in New York, the STRONG High Seas project, together with Germany, the Abidjan Convention Secretariat and the Secretariat of the Permanent Commission for the South Pacific, hosted a capacity building workshop to support State delegates to the negotiations on an international legally binding instrument under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ).

MAVA Foundation and Partners Trained on Adaptative Management for its Oil and Gas Project

Abidjan – The MAVA Foundation for Nature has developed, in close collaboration with key stakeholders in the West African subregion, an intervention strategy for the period 2016-2022. In West Africa, conservation priorities jointly identified with partners have led to the development of eight specific action plans which aim to reduce six threats to six selected biological targets.

CÔTE D’IVOIRE SEEKS AN INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF ITS MARINE AND COASTAL AREA

Abidjan - The Abidjan Convention and the Norwegian Centre of Expertise Grid Arendal have developed a project called "Marine Management in West Africa on Training and Application”. This project funded by the German Ministry of the Environment, Conservation of Nature, Construction and Nuclear Safety, was launched during a workshop which took place in Dakar in April 2016.

PEACE, SECURITY AND STABILITY AT THE HEART OF DISCUSSION IN FÈS, MOROCCO

Abidjan - Fès (Morocco) hosted from 10 to 12 September the International Conference for Culture and Religion Dialogue to discuss peace, security and stability through the following workshops on: (1) languages and religion, (2) artists and their works, (3) key actors of corruption and peace, (4) role of the politic man and the economist, among others.

MANAGEMENT OF THE MARINE AND COASTAL ENVIRONMENT: TOWARDS AN ACTION PLAN ON ABIDJAN CONVENTION’S PROTOCOLS

Abidjan - The Convention for Co-operation in the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Atlantic Coast of the West, Central and Southern Africa Region, known as the Abidjan Convention, its partners and the representatives of the countries within the area of the Convention, started on Monday, September 3, in Abidjan, a workshop aiming at drawing up action plans for the implementation of one existing protocol and three additional ones.

ABIDJAN CONVENTION CONDUCTS AN EVALUATION MISSION ON MANGROVES RESTORATION IN GAMBIA AND GUINEA-BISSAU

Abidjan – A delegation from the Abidjan Convention conducted an evaluation mission on the restauration of mangroves in The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau from 12 to 24 August 2018. This meeting is part of the demonstration project of the Canary Current Large Ecosystem (CCLME) third component on Biodiversity, Habitat and Water Quality.

WEST & CENTRAL AFRICAN CONSERVATIONISTS LAUNCHED NEW EFFORT TO SAVE AQUATIC WILDLIFE

Abidjan – A dedicated multi stakeholder partnership of conservationists from across West Africa teamed up from 23 to 25 July to coordinate actions in the fight to save aquatic wildlife--which are facing an increasing level of threats.


Photo ©: Abidjan Convention Secretariat.

In view of finding strategies to fight against this phenomenon, the Abidjan Convention and its partners; USAID, Wild Migration and Ocean Care convened a meeting in Abidjan, Plateau in the framework of the Abidjan Aquatic Wildlife Partnership (AAWP).

This alliance which was formed following concern raised on this issue at the Abidjan Convention’s Twelfth Conference of the Parties (COP12) in March 2017, seeks to end the unsustainable use of endangered marine and other aquatic species across the coastal countries of West, Central and Southern Africa, which form the mandate area for the Abidjan Convention.

THE ABIDJAN CONVENTION SECRETARIAT RECEIVES SUPPORT FOR ENHANCING PRODUCTIVITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

Abidjan – The Swedish Ministry of Environment and Energy has granted some funds to the Abidjan Convention for enhancing productivity and ecosystem services through integrated transboundary protection and ocean management.

This contribution was made to implement the project which goal is to identify and designate transboundary coastal areas between Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana and Liberia qualified as Marine Protected Areas criteria.

Many independent management measures have been instituted in the countries of the Gulf of Guinea, particularly Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana and Liberia, e.g. Invasive Aquatic weed control, pollution studies as well as algae bloom.

However, these have not been done in an integrated manner considering the transboundary nature of causes and effects of these issues.

Welcome to the Abidjan Convention Secretariat

The Convention for Cooperation in the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Atlantic Coast of the West, Central and Southern Africa Region (Abidjan Convention in short), it covers a marine area from Mauritania to South Africa which has a coastline of just over 14,000 km.

The Convention provides an overarching legal framework for all marine-related programmes in West, Central and Southern Africa.

Under its articles, the Convention lists the sources of pollution that require control as: ships, dumping, land-based activities, exploration and exploitation of the seabed, and atmospheric pollution. It also identifies environmental management issues from which cooperative efforts are meadows, wetlands, barriers and lagoons. These highly productive and diverse ecosystems support fisheries, coastal tourism, industries, minerals such as limestone and sand, busy ports and oil extraction. However, the region’s rapid modernization has led to the unsustainable use of natural resources and to extensive pollution. As a result, crucial habitats are disappearing.

The Convention’s secretariat states its mission as to “Protect, Conserve and Develop the Abidjan Convention Area and its Resources for the Benefit and Well-being of its People.” This is a task that the secretariat is determined to fulfil.

Acknowledging the uniqueness of the coastal and marine environment of the region, as well as its economic and technical limitations decades ago, the countries recognized the need for a regional approach to meet transboundary marine environmental challenges. Thus, after an exploratory environmental assessment mission to 14 regional states in 1976, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) recommended the development of an Action Plan. The Plan is designed to link assessment of the quality of the marine environment and the causes of its deterioration with activities for the management and development of the marine and coastal environment of West, Central and, later, Southern Africa. The Plan was adopted by 11 countries at a conference in Abidjan, March 1981 and came into force on 5 August 1984, after the sixth country deposited its instrument of ratification.

Adoption of the West and Central African regional legal agreements was facilitated by numerous technical surveys, studies and reviews prepared by UNEP with cooperation of the United Nations Organization; the United Nations Industrial Development Organization; the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission; the World Health Organization; the Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization; and other organizations.

For years, particularly from 1985 to 1999, the Abidjan Convention was bedeviled by many difficulties and, as a result, made slow progress. Today, however, the Convention is revitalized, gaining an increasing number of ratified countries, greater payments to its Trust Fund, holding regular meetings and implementing a number of planned activities.

Revitalization has led to the following:

1. Adoption of a Regional Contingency Plans and other Means of Preventing and Combatting Pollution Incidents (2011)

2. Additional Protocol to the Abidjan Convention Concerning Cooperation in the Protection and Development of Marine and Coastal Environment from Land-based Sources and Activities in the Western, Central and Southern African Region (the LSBA Protocol - 2012)

3. The Ad Hoc Committee on Science and Technology (created 2014)

4. Regional Coordination Centre for Marine Pollution Emergency of the Abidjan Convention.

Countries in the Abidjan Convention area: are Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Congo (Democratic Republic of), Congo (Republic of), Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mauritania, Namibia, Nigeria, Sao Tome e Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Togo. Of these, 17 are currently parties to the Convention.